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Posts tagged “animated

Batman: Mask of the Phantasm (1993)

Batman Mask of the PhantasmI am so glad that I did see this animated feature in theatres twenty years ago.  Being a major fan of the animated series, there was no way I couldn’t be excited for it, and it has become a very respected high mark in the DC Animated Universe.  Batman: Mask of the Phantasm does tend to get lost in the mix when discussing the best Batman or even best superhero movies because it was an animated feature.  The film didn’t perform well in theatres, likely do to a less than aggressive marketing campaign.  Even professional film critics Gene Siskel and Robert Ebert did not see it in its theatrical run, but when they did eventually watch it, they indeed loved it.  So, with this preface, I think it’s easy to deduce that this is a definite favorite of mine.

When Gotham City’s most feared gangsters are systematically eliminated, the Cape Crusader is blamed, but prowling the night is a shadowy new villain, the Phantasm, a sinister figure with a vengeful agenda.  Meanwhile, Andrea Beaumont, the one time love of Bruce Wayne’s life, returns to Gotham City stirring up memories including those of how he almost didn’t become Batman.  As all of this unfolds, and the Phantasm becomes a more imminent, lethal threat, the Joker is brought into the fold as a major wild card.  Now, can the Dark Knight elude the police, capture the Phantasm and clear his name?

If you’re unfamiliar with the 1990’s animated series, you need not worry.  This film works entirely as a standalone feature, but for those who were serious fans, there’s a great sense of expansion and increased depth that this film offers.  This is a great story interweaving all threads into an excellent Batman origin, romance, and superhero action movie.  The heart of it is the romantic and heartbreaking story between Bruce and Andrea.  It starts with so much hope and passion, but as with many of Bruce’s loves, it ends in despair and some tragedy.  It’s a beautifully crafted tale that does touch an audience’s heart, and truly shows the emotional depth and humanity of Bruce before and after he becomes Batman.

This film shows us the events leading directly up to Bruce Wayne actually becoming Batman.  I love seeing his first outing as a crime-fighter.  It’s just him in black street attire and a ski mask.  He has the skills, but not the persona, yet.  Batman hasn’t been born, and thus, the key essentially elements of intimidation and mystique aren’t in play.  He’s not the haunting creature of the night that will frighten the criminal element, and afterwards, Bruce realizes that is what he’s missing.  It’s a thrilling action scene as Bruce takes down a group of thieves, and then, hangs off the back of an open van during a police chase.  Yet, the very moment where Bruce Wayne dons the cowl and becomes Batman for the first time is a quintessential moment in my Batman fandom.  No other film has ever matched this moment for me.  Done wholly in shadows, it is a purely simple scene, but perfectly effective and iconic in my eyes.  When he turns to reveal himself to Alfred, the reaction from Bruce’s loyal and lifelong butler is pure shock and fear.  That still sends chills all over my body.

Now, I absolutely love how the stories of Bruce and Andrea intertwine.  The flashbacks to their hot and fast romance are beautiful and classy.  You can see that Bruce is ready to give up the vigilante nightlife to be happy with Andrea forever, but the shady elements of her father, Carl Beaumont’s business dealings forge an inevitable wedge between Bruce and Andrea.  Smartly, these elements are the core of the present day story between Batman and the Phantasm.  It’s also a great turn that the Phantasm’s murders are framed on Batman simply by misidentification.  This forces the Gotham Police to begin a manhunt against Batman, but strongly true to his character, Commissioner Gordon refuses to be apart of it.  He knows that Batman doesn’t kill, and that little moment shows the bond of trust between Gordon and the Dark Knight.  It’s only a shame that that is Gordon’s only scene in the film.  Every aspect of this story flows organically and tightly.  With a 76 minute runtime, it could move at no other or better pace.

By no doubt, Kevin Conroy has been the definitive voice of Batman for over two decades now for legions of fans.  Whenever I read a Batman comic book, it is his voice that I hear as Bruce Wayne and Batman.  Conroy reflects all the best qualities of the character from the upbeat playboy, the serious businessman, the dark, brooding man in the shadows, and the powerfully imposing Dark Knight.  The most important thing is he brings life, depth, and intelligence to Batman.  Producer Bruce Timm and co-writer Paul Dini perfectly understood the character, and throughout this DCAU from Batman: The Animated Series to Batman Beyond to Justice League Unlimited, they stayed true to the core of Batman.  The ideals of justice, humanity, and undying determination have always thrived in this animated interpretation.  Beyond anything else, we see the world’s greatest detective at work, which is something none of the live action films have ever fully embraced.  Batman unravels the mystery of the Phantasm and these crime bosses with cunning and perceptive intelligence.  Conroy embodies all of these subtle, inspiring, and engaging qualities of Batman with a lot of heart and care.  It might only be voice work, but this still stands as the best adaptation of the character to date.

And I couldn’t discount Mark Hamill’s Joker.  Much like with Conroy, he has been a definitive voice for the character to many fans for so long, but has had real competition from great actors in this role.  I am a fan of all versions from Ceasar Romero to Jack Nicholson and beyond.  With the Joker, there’s almost no wrong way to go with him because he is such a radically unpredictable character that he could be very Romero one day and very Ledger the next.  What Hamill does is make the Joker this insane clown who will do whatever hits the biggest punchline in his own twisted mind.  He will still likely kill you, but he’s going to laugh his ass off doing it.  Hamill brings the jovial zaniness meshed with a lethal intimidation that forges a colorful maniac that is endlessly fun and entertaining while still being a major threat.

Beyond the fact that I do really adore Dana Delany, I believe she was a perfect choice to voice Andrea.  She brings a touching beauty of heart and soul to the character.  As the younger Andrea, she’s very optimistic and vibrant.  She’s a young woman with everything to love and embrace in life.  In the present day, she’s a little more heartbroken and tender.  There’s a great emotional complexity to her by the end which is very sad and sympathetic.  Delaney is a wonderful, charming actress, and she does a remarkable job voicing Andrea Beaumont.

The animation style of this feature film is definitely a solid step upwards from the series with more dramatic shading, and a bit more dynamic action sequences.  The opening title sequence even features a beautiful CGI fly through of the Gotham City skyline.  The entire series was heavily inspired by the classic Max Fleisher Superman cartoons, and that is very evident, especially with the great art deco designs.  Adapting this style to Batman pushed everything into a great film noir realm that works stunningly for him.

The main theme from Danny Elfman for Tim Burton’s Batman movies lived on in this DC Animated Universe.  They were reworked by the great, and now late, Shirley Walker.  For this feature, she makes it even more gothic and haunting with a beautiful chorus.  Yet, that’s only just the start of her stunning work.  It’s a fantastic score that rouses an audience, and nails all over the wonderful emotional beats.

And there is plenty of thrilling action throughout this movie.  The Phantasm’s stalking of mob bosses are dark, shadowy, and even a little scary.  They have a looming, ominous presence.  The film unfolds some rousing and even explosive moments at a regular interval, but they entirely flow from the progression of the plot.  Nothing’s extraneous, and it really wastes no time crashing you headlong into the action and story.  The climax with Batman and the Joker at the abandoned World’s Fair is pretty fun.  It shows the Joker’s dangerous playfulness, and creates an escalating sense of peril as he has rigged the whole place to explode.  Yet, the movie ends on the appropriate emotional beats remembering that the story is paramount, and it treats its character with due respect.

Unlike many live action movies, this animated feature was given a lot of creative freedom to its production team, and they were able to deliver a very well fleshed out, wonderfully balanced story.  This is entirely reflective of the quality that was consistently on display with the animated series and its spin-offs and follow-ups.  If you’ve never seen Batman: The Animated Series, this is a great introduction to it, and if you’ve watched and loved it, this is a gem that will satisfy your fandom.  Batman: Mask of the Phantasm is a delightful and amazing animated Batman adventure that is well worth your time.


Transformers: The Movie (1986)

Transformers The MovieOutside of Star Wars, this is the film I grew up on, and loved with a severe passion.  I never owned the VHS as a child.  It was only by renting it incessantly over many, many years that I ever got to see it after the theatres.  My dad actually took me to see this in 1986 at the discount theatre that actually closed down about a decade ago, much to my dismay.  There were countless wonderful memories at that theatre in addition to the video arcade across the way in that mall.  In the late 90s, I found a Canadian website selling new VHS tapes of the movie featuring the American version, and with the help of a friend, I was able to purchase it. I prized this tape, and you couldn’t imagine how excited I was when I happened upon a DVD release of it years later.  So, what is it about this movie that has kept it a beloved favorite of mine for more than a quarter of a century?  Read on and find out!

It is the year 2005, and the battle between the heroic Autobots, led by Optimus Prime, and the evil Decepticons, led by Megatron, has escalated all the way to their home planet of Cybertron, which the Decepticons have reclaimed.  The Autobots secretly plan to retake the planet from secret outposts, but the Decepticons move to thwart their efforts by waging a full-on assault against Autobot City on Earth.  Here, a new generation of heroic Autobots stand ready to fight including the young, impulsive Hot Rod, the consummate soldier Ultra Magnus, the elderly war veteran Kup, the compassionate Arcee, the triple changing Springer, and many more.  However, a greater threat to them all looms closer in the form of the evil entity known as Unicron, who’s ready to consume anything that stands in its way, but the only thing that he fears is the Autobot Matrix of Leadership.  Along the way, lives are lost, battles are fought, an old enemy is re-forged by Unicron, and a new Autobot leader is born as another dies.

This movie really was the pinnacle of any six year’s old life at the time.  You had a big, epic story with huge consequences, and the most climactic final confrontation between the heroic Optimus Prime and the vile Megatron.  To me, this was bigger than Luke Skywalker versus Darth Vader, bigger than anything else on the planet!  Prime was the ultimate John Wayne style hero, always sticking to his principles and morality, but able to throw down with the best of them.  Megatron was the most deceitful, ruthless villain around, and after two seasons of the television series, you finally got to see them collide like never before.  The movie was even marketed as showcasing their final battle, and it did not disappoint.  It starts with Prime proclaiming that, “Megatron must be stopped.  No matter the cost,” and then, proceeds to plow down and blast away a whole slew of Decepticons.  It firmly establishes that Optimus is a real bad ass worth rooting for.  This is the big hero of the Autobots, and anyone who gets in his way has got a real problem.  The fight between Megatron and Prime is them putting it all out on the line, and it couldn’t be more climactic.  It’s also an awesome looking sequence with great dramatic angles, and an awesome Stan Bush song backing it up.  Then, it ends on a wholly unexpected note.  The filmmakers really hit you for a big one in more ways than one.  Optimus Prime dies.  However, it happens within the first third of the film creating a sense of ultimate peril for everyone.  If Optimus Prime can perish in this movie, then, nobody at all is safe, and even before this, the Deceptions slaughter an entire ship of Autobots in fairly graphic fashion.  This film tells you just about from the start that it’s taking no prisoners, and the danger is real and imminent.  This creates huge odds for the surviving Autobots to overcome, especially in the face of Unicron.

With so many of the classic characters dying, the movie introduces us to a group of new Autobots which hooked me in immediately.  I loved Hot Rod, and was really behind him all the way through the story.  Judd Nelson did a great job voicing him giving the young, brash Autobot a lot of charm, charisma, energy, and humor.  Yet, where it counted, Hot Rod was heroic, and did show some depth to really rise up and come into his own.  The weathered and seasoned warrior Kup is given great texture by Lionel Stander making him a fun character with his incessant war stories, but also striking a good chemistry with Nelson’s Hot Rod.  The older mentor and the young hero is nothing new, but here, it feels like these two were friends more than teacher and student, which makes for a fun pairing.

Springer feels like a solid lieutenant in the Autobot ranks as the reliable, capable soldier, and has strong characterization with dashes of levity.  And you can say what you will about Ultra Magnus.  He’s certainly not the inspiring leader that Optimus was, but he was voiced by the late, great Robert Stack.  Being an old school Unsolved Mysteries fan, I could never slight Mr. Stack’s performance.  He does give Ultra Magnus some humanity and a steady confidence, but I think, by design, the filmmakers didn’t want Magnus living up to Optimus’ stature.  This becomes apparent by the film’s end.

The villains are given some new life with two impressive names added to the cast.  First, there is Leonard Nimoy voicing Galvatron in amazing fashion giving the new Deception leader an even more vicious streak than he had as Megatron.  After his brutal fight with Optimus Prime, Megatron is recreated as this far more powerful Galvatron, and that injects a far more menacing and cutthroat villain into the story.  Nimoy pushed his voice into a deeper, more guttural place for this performance, and it really served the character beautifully.  Galvatron is Megatron pushed to the next level, and I really love that idea.  However, the real major name involved here is Orson Welles as Unicron.  This was actually the legendary filmmaker’s final performance.  His heart attack death occurred five days after finishing this voice work.  Reportedly, Welles was pleased do the job stating an admiration for animated films.  While Welles could be an intimidating man, I’ve seen interviews of him being very friendly, humble, and enjoyable.  Still, that voice was gold, and there were not many actors who could’ve naturally given such a booming, massive presence to Unicron’s voice as Welles did.

With all these great characters, old and new, we are given endlessly quotable dialogue.  Nary a scene goes by without a great line being said which became a classic amongst fans.  These range from the dramatic to the comedic, and are all executed perfectly by this great voice cast.  They really deserve a vast amount of credit for inhabiting the personalities of their characters, and meshing so well together.  It sounds like every single one of them gave it their all, and likely had a real fun time working on this animated movie.  The regular cast of voice actors maintain their usual high standards, especially Peter Cullen and Frank Welker, among others.  The Dinobots are especially funny while still remaining formidable.  This is some very exceptional casting and voice directing in my opinion.

What really strikes me about the movie today is how briskly paced it is.  There is nary a slow point in the whole thing, and at 84 minutes long, one could hardly expect one.  Surely, these days, I would’ve loved to have seen it reach a full 90 minutes because that third act really hits you before you know it.  Regardless, the steady pace and rhythm of the movie creates so much excitement and fun.  There is no shortage of action, and any scenes of exposition are very succinct.  The regular progression of the story taking our heroes to new worlds and environments keeps it interesting.  Both the planet of Junk and of the Quintessons are dangerous in their own unique ways with great visual designs.  They give the film scope that was rarely offered on the television series.  Everything about this movie is amped up substantially from the episodic cartoon, and the action is no exception.  I don’t think I’ve ever seen a movie, animated or live action, jam pack this much stellar and original action into such a compact run time while still maintaining such a rich sense of character and competency in its plot.  There’s so much energy pulsating through this movie it’s almost unreal, and it never becomes a mess.  Screenwriter Ron Friedman did a rather admirable job on this script, and it was put into the right hands to make it a reality.

Now, granted, there’s hardly a major through-line plot for our heroes.  In the most part, the Autobots are just trying to survive every new threat that surfaces in their path while Unicron sort of looms over everything in the background.  The action really just pushes them along from one dire scenario to the next until they must confront Unicron.  These are adventures which have the heroes proving their merit to the audience more than to each other.  It’s about us learning about the characters, and coming to care about them instead of developing them at length.  Transformers: The Movie doesn’t have the character growth or thematic exploration of something like Star Wars or The Lord of the Rings, but for what it is meant to be, a fun and exciting animated movie for kids, I think it is rather exceptional.  It doesn’t go much into heavy subject matter, save for the deaths early on, but it doesn’t treat its young audience as stupid.  It’s a smartly written story that keeps it simple enough to follow, but exciting enough to keep it interesting.  This is definitely a film that can be entertaining from the age of six all the way through to thirty-two.

One thing that strongly helps in that aspect is that the animation style is still amazing to my eyes today.  At the time of the film’s release, it was a style and quality not previously seen by mainstream American audiences.  The detail, shading, and dramatic, epic imagery created a vast cinematic visual impact.  The film remained vibrant and colorful despite having some very dark moments, and could have real moments of beauty.  While there are occasional animation gaffes and shots of lower grade artwork, on the whole, the artistry on display is really stunning adding a sense of edge and texture to everything never before given to the cartoon series.  This feels like a major motion picture event, and in comparison to the series, you can clearly see the vast amount of time and hard work put into the visual quality of this movie.

Probably the biggest thing that kept the film alive in my mind and heart between rentals was the amazing rock soundtrack!  I cherished that audio cassette for over a decade.  I made the vow to myself that when the tape eventually broke, I would buy the CD immediately, and that’s exactly what happened.  Most of these acts were generally unknowns like Lion, N.R.G., and Kick Axe (who were credited as Spectre General by decree of the record company), but contributed very solid songs that gave a lot of hard and heavy excitement to the film.  Of course, “Weird Al” Yankovic was quite well known at the time.  He contributed his quirky track “Dare to be Stupid,” which fit the catch-phrase referencing Junkions perfectly.  Stan Bush’s tracks have probably become the biggest hits amongst fans with the driving rock rhythm of “Dare,” and the inspirational “The Touch.”  The latter is a song that has come to really be able to pull me through into a stronger, more determined mindset when I’m feeling down.  It pushes me back up on my feet, and it does much the same within the context of the movie highlighting the biggest standing tall moment for our main heroes.  This is one of my favorite soundtracks ever, and it is only enhanced further by Vince DiCola’s very dynamic, electronic style score.

The climax of Transformers: The Movie is just flat out amazing!  I like the intercutting between the battle outside of Unicron as he fends off the attacks from Cybertron, and the multiple stories going on inside of him.  However, it hits its great crescendo in glorious fashion when the Autobot Matrix of Leadership comes into the right hands, and signals a new era for the Autobots.  The movie is filled with great, iconic moments such as this, but few as great as this.  In retrospect, it’s only a shame that the movie ends so quickly after this, but I suppose, in that regard, it’s a film that leaves you wanting more.  That’s rarely a bad thing, and it’s far better than overstaying its welcome or leaving itself open for any letdowns after such a great climax.

Despite the efforts of Michael Bay, this still remains the absolute best Transformers movie in existence.  It features a tight, exciting, and heroic story centered on the Autobots and Decepticons themselves that is vibrant as well as genuinely funny and entertaining for the whole family.  Of course, most versions contain a swear word or two that are surprising they made it into the PG rated film in 1986, but for fans, they wouldn’t want the movie any other way.  This 1986 movie treats its characters with respect and integrity, and gives many of them poignant weight at their most pivotal moments.  The new characters are just as exciting and colorful as the classic ones, and they give the film a real boost of energy and sense of discovery.  You’re going along for the ride with them as they rise to the epic task before them.  As I said, I was hooked in with Hot Rod from the start, and unlike many who saw the film as a kid, I actually didn’t cry during Optimus Prime’s death scene.  It’s unheard of, I know, but I was just enjoying the living hell of this movie.  At one time, I definitely would have listed this as my favorite movie of all time, and it is still among my favorites, as this review has undoubtedly shown.  While the film bombed at the box office, it has gained immense popularity throughout the fan base, and remains a major high point in the franchise.  All around, this is just a wildly fun movie that I will never get tired of.  While the television series doesn’t hold up nearly as well, this movie feels damn near timeless to me, and I don’t believe I am alone in that feeling.


Justice League: Doom (2012)

In recent months, I started buying comics again, and of course, one of the first I grabbed was Justice League.  With DC revamping their full line of books with 52 all new #1 issues, it was a perfect entry point.  I was a serious fan of the Justice League and Justice League Unlimited animated series, and while this is not of the same continuity, all of the main voice actors were brought back for this outing.  So, that made this animated movie quite special for me.  What we have in Justice League: Doom is a very stellar story crafted by some amazing talents as DC Comics’ premiere superhero team battles with more than just villains, but a breach of trust within their own ranks.

Soon after thwarting an attempted robbery by the Royal Flush Gang, the Justice League of America comes under the attack of Vandal Savage’s Legion of Doom.  The immortal conqueror has assembled a team of villains to defeat Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, The Flash, Green Lantern, and the Martian Manhunter.  Concerned of the consequences should his fellow crime fighters ever turn their backs on humanity, Batman created a set of methods for which to immobilize Earth’s most powerful superheroes in the event of an emergency.  However, Vandal Savage breaches the Batcave’s security and obtains these files allowing for his team of villains to use them for lethal intent.  Now, joined by the young hero Cyborg, the JLA must overcome deep feelings of betrayal to defeat the diabolical Legion of Doom before Savage launches a missile that will destroy half the planet allowing for himself to be situated as ruler of all mankind.

While there is a lot of subject matter I will delve into, first and foremost, I want to say that this is a thoroughly enjoyable, fun, and exciting motion picture.  It is full of great action, excellent characterizations, and plenty of epic, heroic moments that will inevitable please any adventure-loving viewer.  There is plenty of levity throughout to counterweight to more dramatic storyline, and the balance between them is beautifully handled.  There is much to examine and highlight with this animated feature.

This was adapted from a 1990s story arc in the JLA comic book titled Tower of Babel, and a few changes were made.  The line-up of the team is different which originally included Aquaman and Plastic Man.  The roles of Green Lantern and the Flash were originally the relatively newer heroes of Kyle Rayner and Wally West, but are now the more classic Hal Jordan and Barry Allen.  Also, Cyborg is only a recent addition to the Justice League of the comics, but he is nicely integrated into this story.  His role shows a young hero earning his keep by stepping up in a chaotic situation, and using his unique skills to help resolve it.  The main villain was also changed from the endlessly fascinating Ras’ Al Ghul to the less dimensional Vandal Savage.  Using Ras’ made more logical sense since he is a Batman villain who has infiltrated the Bat-cave numerous times, and it is established that he knows Bruce Wayne is Batman.  Plus, his motives are usually more ideological in nature whereas Vandal Savage is usually just about conquering the world.  Still, they are both megalomaniacal in their own ways.  However, despite these peculiar changes, the story still works excellently adapting new motives and dynamics to these different characters.

Every superhero is handled with substantial depth and respect.  The story allows for an audience to see most of the JLA outside of their superhero personas.  You see Barry Allen attending to a crime scene as a police forensic investigator, Clark Kent at a press conference as a reporter, Martian Manhunter in his human guise as a police detective, and Bruce Wayne in his interactions with Alfred.  They are brief moments, but enough to show an audience that these people do live lives outside of their costumes.  In their lives, there are people who they personally care about, and those that care deeply for them.  I did especially like how Alfred was written being the rational voice to Batman’s more obsessive, workaholic mentality.  It shows that Alfred is still his keeper, and can exercise authority over him due to a long standing respect.  Batman wants to keep working, pushing through the pain and fatigue to resolve this new mystery, but Alfred reminds him that he is human and needs rest and mending.  Bruce could override Alfred’s mandate, but he would never disrespect Alfred’s better judgment.  The interactions of these characters display a history amongst them.  Little quips about how Ace “sucker punched” Superman before, or Hal and Batman talking about who is ahead in saving whose life really creates a long standing trust and camaraderie here.  This makes the impact of Batman’s secretive contingency plans a stronger blow because we can see how much they are friends on top of being teammates.  What is really great is what Batman reveals as his contingency plan for himself at the end, and it hit me as very telling of Batman’s true nature of trust.

I also enjoyed that the entire League is not unanimously opposed to Batman’s contingency plans.  They are all stunned by it, but subtle actions by some of them suggest a more open minded, fair viewpoint.  I can entirely see Hal Jordan being for it as, at least in the comics, he went completely insane and killed the Green Lantern Corps when infected by the fear entity Parallax.  He’s also seen someone like Sinestro, who was a Green Lantern, betray the Corps and become an enemy as well.  So, having counter-measures in place to neutralize a rogue member would be a wise precaution in his eyes.  However, most of the League would view this as a betrayal of trust, and no one is entirely wrong.  When Tower of Babel was written Batman was being made into an increasingly more paranoid character, and so, while his ideas might have been wise, his secrecy might be arguable.   However, Batman never takes time to brood about this, or feel regret over it.  He remains strong in his belief that what he did was a necessary precaution, and it’s only Savage’s twisting of their intent that made them potentially objectionable, in his eyes.  Being the sole non-super powered member of the team, he has a unique perspective to see how destructive their powers could be if mind control or a psychological break were to turn them to the side of evil.

Of course, the voice cast is excellent!  Having the same actors back who I loved in the old DC Animated Universe just added an extra special quality to the film.  Kevin Conroy and Tim Daly have been voicing Batman and Superman, respectively, for a long time, and have earned a respectable standing in the annals of these characters.  Conroy is the voice of Batman to me, forever and always.  He captures every psychological and emotional nuance of the character perfectly, and clearly enjoys voicing the Dark Knight.  Daly embodies the moral sensibilities and epic quality of Superman wonderfully.  Michael Rosenbaum is clearly a great actor, and he is able to adapt his voice acting nicely from Wally West to Barry Allen.  There’s still a playful aspect to his performance, but it’s more restrained, a little more mature now.  He clearly made a conscious effort to differentiate the two performances.  The only change-up here is the amazing Nathan Fillion as Hal Jordan reprising his role from the Green Lantern animated movies.  His performance truly transcends expectations meshing greatly with the animation direction to create strong emotional moments.  Fillion offers up great jovial quips, but also, deep emotional resonance for Hal.  He creates an interesting and fun character that holds a lot of weight.  Lastly, Phil Morris, who portrayed the Martian Manhunter on Smallville, takes on Vandal Savage, and does a thoroughly effective job at it.  He gives Savage a nice touch of majesty and culture wrapped in an imposing megalomaniacal package.  The remainder of the cast inhabit their characters superbly keeping things strong, vibrant, and powerful throughout, but it doesn’t end with just the voice acting.

I have really enjoyed the animation style of these animated movies.  I have seen Superman/Batman: Public Enemies, Superman/Batman: Apocalypse, Justice League: Crisis on Two Earths, and Batman: Under The Red Hood (which I previously reviewed).  All of these have had some slightly different character models, but they have all raised the animation standards for this medium.  They are nicely detailed giving each character their own unique look, angles, and energy.  All of the heroes here seem a little younger than usual, but that’s exactly what DC Comics has done with their new continuity.  So, it did not throw me off at all.  The motion of the animation is very fluid making for some dynamic and exciting action sequences.  Those sequences are also smartly handled by never making them frivolous.  The heroes have to work hard for their victories, and each action scene furthers the story along.  The Royal Flush Gang tends to be a token, generic band of villains to battle, but here, they are made more formidable.  They have cunning, skill, power, and some cohesion.  As dialogue suggests, they have eluded the JLA before, and so, everyone steps up their game so to not repeat that loss.  The Justice League uses teamwork and smarts to ultimately triumph over them.

Scenes play out with a solid cinematic style aided by an excellent color scheme to bring out vibrancy and mood.  These enhance the subversive elements in the story creating a mysterious, foreboding atmosphere.  The creative design of locations is very cool.  I really loved the waterfall interior setting of the Bat-cave.  It offers up a different aesthetic than I’ve seen applied before.  I felt it was a little inspired by the one in Batman Begins due to the waterfall entrance in Christopher Nolan’s film.  Also, the Hall of Doom was a nice update from the old SuperFriends cartoon.  It still has all the classic design elements, but it reflects Vandal Savage’s personality with various pieces of elegant art that depict him only.

The story unfolds in a very tight fashion.  Pacing is consistent throughout.  As DC is keeping these hovering around the 75 minute mark, there’s hardly time to let the story lag anywhere, but it’s more a fact that there are no extraneous elements present.  It’s a very lean, meaty storytelling structure staying right on point with the plot elements and character dynamics.  Every plot element that is introduced has a purpose.  They all tie back into the story at some point, and grow organically from the conflicts or crises that develop.  They really took Tower of Babel as a template, an idea, and built a fresh story around it using a new set of character dynamics and relationships to create Justice League: Doom.  That is very smart screenwriting, and that was evidently the standard for the late Dwayne McDuffie.  Brilliant stories filled with well rounded, well realized characters and themes.  He surely hit every character squarely on the mark in this instance crafting their psychologies and histories around a very intelligent storyline.  When the Leaguers are taken down in the second act, there is such an epic and powerful weight given to it all.  It’s not handled like “just another villain victory.”  These are moments that could claim all of their lives, and it is no easy feat for them to bounce back from it.  Beyond just the physical toll, it becomes an emotional and personal injury that they need to overcome to move forward with stopping the Legion of Doom.  These moments are given their due time so that their epic weight can come crashing down upon the viewer.  It is an amazing sequence that gripped me tightly as it unfolded.

My only down comment is that, at the end, I would’ve preferred a more sound tactical approach in the villains and heroes pairing off.  When you have such equal opponents setup here, it would be more logical to change them up.  Have Flash take on Cheetah, Batman against Mirror Master, Superman against Bane, or Martian Manhunter battling Star Sapphire.  Throw the villains off guard by pitting an opponent against them they are not prepared for instead of each hero battling their common enemy.  I can understand the storytelling significance of having each hero take down the villain that defeated them earlier in the story, but this suggested approach also makes sound storytelling sense.  The Legion of Doom outsmarted them once.  Now, it should be the JLA’s turn to outsmart them instead of just throwing down like they’ve done countless times before with the same enemies.  This is especially so since there’s a missile ready to be launched that will destroy half the Earth.  No time for personal vendettas.  For me, it would’ve been more satisfying if they had taken a smarter approach by changing up the fight dynamics instead of trying to settle scores when the fate of half the world is at stake.  However, that is merely my own personal issue, but the climax of the film doesn’t end with a hero-villain fight.  The Justice League still has a crisis on their hands that requires each member to give it their all to avert disaster, and that only made for a far more intense and satisfying ending.

This is a very dramatic story that deals squarely with the characters on numerous levels.  It raises a very involved issue about trust amongst a group of people with secret identities and super powers.  Despite their own personal secrets, they have come to trust each other, but at some point, there must be an objective point of view questioning ‘what if.’  Beyond just the potential of mind control or magic manipulating them, anyone is capable of using their power to do something destructive through emotional or psychological turmoil.  When that day comes, someone has to be prepared to deal with it, and Batman surely felt it was his responsibility to prepare for that.  Batman, at his best, has always been about doing what’s needed, not what’s popular.  The film doesn’t address the complexities of the issue, but it does address how the characters deal with it.  That is what’s important, in the long run, and it would truly be intriguing to see a direct follow-up to this story to know how this team moves forward from here.

All of this simply results in an extremely well rounded animated movie.  The foundations of its success truly began with Dwayne McDuffie’s immense talent and brilliance as screenwriter.  I have not had a wide spread exposure to his work, but from what I have learned of it, Justice League: Doom exemplifies much of what he was admired for.  This is written with so much depth and knowledge of the characters that it works as an excellent entry point for anyone into the DC Universe.  The loss of all the stories McDuffie still could’ve given fans worldwide is hard to fathom, but it is clear that his talent will be forever missed.  However, he left behind a large catalog of work for us all to enjoy at our leisure.  So, I would say starting here would be a fine choice.  Justice League: Doom has thrilling action, great excitement, rock solid dramatic storytelling, wonderfully fun characters, and is an all around enjoyable watch.  It’s an attention grabber from beginning to end, and I know for me, it left me wanting more of this greatness.  As I know it does for the great guys at the Raging Bullets DC Comics fan podcast, whose own review helped me fuel mine, this movie makes me long for the return of a Justice League animated series.


Batman: Under The Red Hood (2010)

My interest in comics was re-sparked recently.  I’ve bought them on and off since the 90s depending on cash flow.  Since childhood Batman has been the absolute pinnacle of superheroes to me.  The Adam West show, Superfriends, Batman: The Animated Series, the live action films from 1989 to 2008, and beyond has made me a hardcore Batman fan!  My latest enthusiasm lead me to take an interest in the DC animated movie Batman: Under The Red Hood.  There is some background to offer with this review on Batman comic history.  In the 1980s, DC Comics decided to mature Dick Grayson, the original Robin, into his own man and became Nightwing.  Batman was now without a sidekick, and DC hurried a new Robin into the comics.  His name was Jason Todd.  After a company wide continuity revamp called Crisis on Infinite Earths, what was previously a poorly conceived Dick Grayson carbon copy was changed into a punk kid that divided fans.  So, a storyline was developed where the fans would call a 900 number to determine Jason’s fate.  The vote came down to about 72 for Jason’s death at the hands of the Joker.  About twenty years later, the choice was made to resurrect Jason Todd as a Batman villain in the guise of the Red Hood – the Joker’s original criminal identity.  This animated movie adapts that story, and I feel it delivers an excellent piece of entertainment.  Of course, this comes from someone who never read the “A Death in the Family” or “Under The Hood” graphic novels.

International terrorist Ra’s Al Ghul, one of Batman’s most formidable adversaries, comes into great regret over his latest actions which involve hiring the Joker as a diversion for the Dark Knight.  It goes terribly wrong when the Clown Prince of Crime claims the life of Robin #2, Jason Todd.  Years later, a new masked figure appears in Gotham City calling himself the Red Hood.  Part vigilante, part crime lord, he begins cleaning up crime with masterful efficiency, but without Batman’s ethical moral code.  He rattles the cage of the biggest crime kingpin in Gotham, the Black Mask, and they launch into a violent war.  And when the Joker is brought into the mix, everything begins to fly out of control.  However, Batman’s suspicions over this new violent player forces him to seek out startling revelations and confront hard truths that open old wounds.

What might first strike you about this is the darker, more violent tone of the animated film.  It is rated PG-13.  So, it’s not a children’s film.  There is blood and a guy getting set on fire.  There’s brutality and murder.  It has heavy themes rolling through it of death, murder, redemption, revenge, sorrow, grief, and regret.  It is designed for a mature audience able to handle heavier subject matter, and grasp the emotional weight of the story.

Now, I grew up with Kevin Conroy as the voice of the animated Batman from Batman: The Animated Series on through to Justice League Unlimited.  I own all those series and movies featuring his voice as the Dark Knight.  I even hear his voice when I read Batman in any comic book.  However, Bruce Greenwood was tapped to voice Bruce Wayne / Batman here, and I was not at all disappointed or put off by it.  Greenwood inhabits the tone of both the character and the story excellently.  Much credit is to be given to screenwriter Judd Winick for capturing the essence of Batman here, but Greenwood slips into the proverbial cape and cowl smoothly.  In true Batman style, he expresses his heart in subtle, brief moments.  Similarly, John DiMaggio absorbs himself into the Joker.  At first, I wasn’t entirely certain if I was hearing veteran Joker voice actor Mark Hamill or not, but DiMaggio brings a deeper voice to the microphone that makes Batman’s archenemy more unsettling.  He’s a little darker, more Heath Ledger like in his portrayal, but still delivering the exuberant insanity that Hamill was a master at.  It is a very appropriate portrayal for this darker edged story.

The focal point of the story is Jason Todd, and he is voiced by Jensen Ackles of The CW’s Supernatural.  I feel Jensen does an admirable job here, but at times, the voice sounds a little too mature, too deep for the character’s age.  Jason’s probably in his late teens, maybe early twenties.  Jensen does lighten up his voice from what he uses in his signature role of Dean Winchester.  However, he does portray the role here very well projecting Todd’s charisma, humor, intellect, aggression, hatred, and conviction in well rounded form.  Jason started as a punk kid that Batman attempted to mold into a better person, but he never succeeded.  What he evolves into is someone that has the same core ideal of Batman to combat crime and using much the same tactics, but with more extreme methods drawing the line of how much violence is enough farther out.  He believes that Batman cannot ultimately succeed because he puts limits on himself.  Jason is a character I have become very intrigued by as he walks that thin anti-hero line where he could be a hero or a villain at any given moment depending on circumstance and motive.

In the role of Nightwing is Neil Patrick Harris who perfectly captures the light-hearted charisma and sharp wit of Batman’s original protégé.  How the story portrays Dick Grayson is fantastic.  Dick & Bruce work in tandem battling foes with grace and efficiency.  They finish each other’s thoughts, both thinking the same amount of steps ahead to swing in at the right time for the save.  I’ve always enjoyed Nightwing as a character full of potential.  Here, he’s mainly involved in just the action sequences, but he makes them so much more dynamic with his acrobatics and sense of fun in the face of danger.  I am wholehearted believer in the unlimited potential of Nightwing and Dick Grayson.  By trusted accounts, he made for a wonderful Batman following the “Battle for the Cowl” comic story arc.

I was never exposed to the Black Mask before this, but after this, I am very pleased.  I laughed so hard at his scenes.  His character is blowing a gasket at how the Red Hood is beating down his criminal empire, and he takes it out on every henchman he has.  Slugging them left and right, and ultimately, fending for himself when danger comes crashing through his window.  I found the character immensely entertaining here, but I’m sure, in normal circumstances, he’s portrayed in a more calm, in control, and vile fashion.  Wade Williams just delivers an entertaining, personality rich performance that practically makes the whole movie for me.

I highly enjoyed the animation style.  Very easy on the eyes with smooth motion, and fine, fresh character designs.  They capture the characters very sharply with a good deal of personality injected into their look and movements.  The action sequences are handled with so much detail and dynamic motion.  They are beautifully cinematic and enjoyably exhilarating.  The characters move fluidly with amazing fight choreography.  There’s a fight between Batman and Red Hood late in the film inside a bathroom filled with hard surfaces where you not only get some inspired visceral moments, but the emotion is strongly, deeply ingrained into the intensity of the fight.  However, what I very much love is the look of Gotham City.  The color scheme of the city at night is very alluring and beautiful.  It has a fine glow that gives it atmosphere and ambience, something Gotham must always have.  It is a character unto itself with a personality all its own that forges these characters down these darkened paths.

I think how the story is handled is very smart and poignant.  There are flashbacks throughout the film, but they are injected into the story and visuals in two ways.  One is the straight flashback, but others are more ghostly.  Ghosts of the past haunting Batman when Red Hood leads him to a place of remembrance.  It brings special emotional context to this troubling story that puts so much in conflict for Bruce and Jason.  The climax is brilliantly written and performed.  Everyone gets their moment to shine at their strongest.  Joker has probably the most hilarious, manic moment my memory can recall.  You’re almost excited for him because he’s so exuberant.  Still, it is the deep sense of love that Jason and Bruce have for each other like a son and father which strikes deep.  By the end, it can be heartbreaking.

The only other thing to address with the movie is the absence of Tim Drake, the third Robin.  In the comic book storyline, Tim was Batman’s current sidekick, and was apparently involved in the story.  However, I understood why they did not include him in this adaptation.  They introduced Jason as Robin, and then, introduced Nightwing as having been the original Robin.  Throwing yet another one in there that came after Jason’s death could’ve been confusing for an uninitiated audience.  You would see Robin die, and then, you see Batman working alongside another Robin without an immediate explanation that they are different characters would be highly disorienting.  This is especially so since all three characters have the same basic character design – lean, athletic build with black hair in similar red-green-yellow costumes.  Nightwing essentially fills the role that Tim Drake would’ve had in this story.  No disrespect to Tim, but for me, I think having Dick Grayson present was a smart change.  This is because he and Bruce have a longer history together, and really are like best friends instead of mentor and student at this point in time.  It allows for a stronger contrast from Bruce’s original protégé who became a crowning achievement for him against the failure that was Jason Todd.

With all that said, watching this film makes me want to by the graphic novel to experience this in more depth.  It is a wonderfully conceived and executed piece of work that I have watched three times within a week and a half.  My only negative mark I have for the film is that it only runs 75 minutes.  A full 90 minutes would’ve felt more fleshed out and a little more satisfying.  However, DC Animated has been keeping about a 75 minute cap on their feature films, likely due to production costs.  Regardless, what is here is powerful and impactful.  It feels like a true Batman story filled with a lot of fun action, deep emotional drama, and rich, well developed characters.  If you have enjoyed Christopher Nolan’s live action Batman films, I think you will find a lot to enjoy on a similar level here.  I give it a very strong recommendation to anyone that has a love for Batman, as I do.