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Highlander: The Final Dimension (1994)

Coming three years after the disaster that was Highlander 2: The Quickening, this sequel absolutely plays it safe.  It also demonstrates a lack of ambition or originality in how much it directly borrows from the first movie without even disguising it.  The highly successful television series starring Adrian Paul as Duncan MacLeod was already on the air, but the producers of the franchise decided to give Connor MacLeod another theatrical outing.  It surely doesn’t measure up to the first film, as it is a formulaic sequel, but it is an enjoyable film that did have some good potential.

In 16th century Japan, immortal Scotsman Connor MacLeod (Christopher Lambert) is mentored by the sorcerer and master of illusion Nakano (Mako).  However, when an evil, ravaging immortal named Kane (Mario Van Peebles) raids a nearby village, and comes looking for the sorcerer, the ensuing quickening from Nakano’s death seals Kane and his minions in the mountain cave for the next four centuries.  In present day, an excavation is underway to determine the truth of the legend of Nakano, headed up by archaeologist Alexandra Johnson (Deborah Unger).  However, this excavation aids Kane in his escape from the cave, and immediately begins his search for MacLeod.  Since his defeat of the Kurgan, Connor has adopted a son, but also, lost his wife Brenda to a car accident which he survived without a scratch.  He’s known he was not the last immortal, and now, he knows that it is Kane who still lives.  Both Connor MacLeod and Kane travel to New York, the site of the Gathering, to do battle and claim The Prize once and for all.

This story is fairly good, but would even be rather average for the television series.  It’s nothing exceptional or stunning.  It’s not trying to do anything original or break new ground for the franchise, and it knows it.  It’s more playing around in the world of Highlander, having a little bit of fun, but not trying to build upon anything.  As with the previous sequel, gone is the sense of magic and mystery.  Connor MacLeod is still portrayed well by Christopher Lambert, still injecting some charm and confidence into the role.  However, it really is that sense of world weariness that made him captivating to begin with.  You could feel the weight and aura of centuries lived in Lambert’s performance.  It gave the character depth and texture.  Here, all that is absent, and instead, we get a much more standard protagonist who is enjoyable, yet lacks gravitas to really draw in an audience.  The thing is with this movie is that it feels like a second rate version of Highlander, but in the least, it never takes itself too seriously for too long.  This is mainly by way of the character of Kane.

Mario Van Peebles is an excellent talent in front of and behind the camera, and I know this is not representative of his highest acting qualities.  There are both positives and negatives to say about his performance as Kane.  How you take his performance is based on how you want to perceive the movie.  In general, he’s basically a carbon copy of the Kurgan only not written as well, and portrayed with an especially over-the-top, tongue-in-cheek mentality.  Van Peebles even puts on a very gravely Kurgan-esque voice as Kane, which bares next to no resemblance to his natural voice.  As Kane, he certainly has formidable moments where we see how lethal and vile Kane truly is, solidifying his weight and threat as a villain.  However, Van Peebles is entirely indulging himself in this role, and if you choose to view the film as a fun, lightweight flick, you can certainly find enjoyment from this performance.  Mario Van Peebles is clearly enjoying living in the skin of this villain with his performance bordering on campy.  He’s certainly a long way off from chewing as much scenery as Bruce Payne did in Highlander: Endgame, though.  Still, Kane is written with some rather unrealistic dialogue.  For a guy that’s been buried in a cave for the last four hundred years, he certainly has picked up late twentieth century slang quite swiftly in addition to learning how to drive a car.  Throughout the film, even in the sixteenth century scenes, he entirely comes off like a modern villain instead of one displaced in time and culture.

Also, while the design of Kane is pretty awesome with the long hair, goatee, and tattoos, I think the nipple rings are just a tad too much.  They are on both his armor and himself, and just make Kane more modern looking than he should be.  Thankfully, we’re not exposed to them long as Kane adopts some very good looking Asian style threads.  It again comes off as an attempt to emulate the style of the Kurgan, but with a 90s flavor.  I really do believe Kane could’ve been taken in a much more credible direction, and made for a slightly more original and straightly serious villain.  Instead, the filmmakers chose the route of levity.  Still, there are other issues which hold the film down from being as good as it could have been.

Regardless, whether you call this The Final Dimension or The Sorcerer, this does feel more like the kind of sequel one would expect.  It follows up on the police investigation threads from the first movie, and uses footage and dialogue from the original to further the story and character points forward.  It might seem a little frivolous at times, but I don’t have much of a gripe with it.  I like how this was done in Endgame as well.  However, there is flashing back to the first movie for context, and then, there’s badly copying scenes from that same movie.

Such is the case when Kane goes on a psychotic joy ride with Connor’s adopted son.  It’s a real poor excuse considering none of the danger is actually real, just an illusion generated by Kane.  It’s a pathetic and blatant attempt to recapture something awesome from the first film while doing it with only a fraction of the talent. Even if done nearly as well, it would still be lame because it’s a retread instead of trying to do something original.  Even kidnapping a loved one of Connor’s to force a final confrontation also emulates what the Kurgan did in the first movie.  It is stuff like this which make this movie a pale imitation of the original Highlander.

I will give credit to the aspect of the police investigation.  Lieutenant John Stenn remembers the original string of beheadings, and who the sole suspect was at the time.  With MacLeod back in town with a new beheading, he immediately puts it all back together.  It is a part of this story that makes the film feel like a continuation of the first, and I do feel it was well done.  Stenn has an understandable contempt for MacLeod, and is quite dogged about his investigation.  It is a pretty good performance by actor Martin Neufeld.

Deborah Unger is very good in her dual roles.  However, I do find the entire aspect of Alex bearing a dead-on resemblance to a centuries past lost love of Connor’s to be unnecessary and a little forced.  The romantic relationship between Alex and Connor could’ve easily worked without that odd connection, and possibly could’ve had more time to develop without those flashbacks.  I think this idea was only there so that the filmmakers could have occasional flashback sequences to better resemble the style of the original movie.  It’s not badly handled, but it does feel like a diversion from the actual relevant aspects of the plot.

Regardless, Unger does a very fine job as the film’s female lead.  Her performance is very grounded showing a fine range of levity, passion, and dramatic weight.  She carries herself very solidly, and works very well opposite Lambert.  Also, Deborah Unger is probably the sexiest, most sultry looking woman of the Highlander films.  She even insisted on not using a body double for the fully nude and steamy sex scene late in the film.  While the romantic storyline between Connor and Alex doesn’t develop as strongly as other Highlander loves have, it is serviceable, and nicely played by both actors.

I will also hand it to this film’s cinematographer.  This is a very well shot and well lit movie.  The bowels of the hospital where Connor encounters Kane’s henchman has some gorgeous blues and oranges creating a beautiful atmosphere.  Overall, we get some very cinematic camera angles and movement with stellar work when it comes to the action sequences and sword fights.  While the film lacks the epic grandeur and sweeping visual quality that was a given with Russell Mulcahy, I will give it credit for looking quite a bit better than your usual 1990s fare from Dimension Films.  This can possibly be credited to director Andy Morahan being primarily a music video director, same as where Mulcahy started out.  He knows how to capture great visuals, and that is in no dispute here.  Although, it seems Morahan never broke out from music videos.  This was his first feature film, and he’s not done much of anything else outside of music videos ever since.  He directs this film pretty well, handling the action, drama, and levity of it very evenly.  It certainly isn’t an example of a breakout directorial debut, but there have been far worse action filmmakers out there who have had bigger careers making lower quality films.  So, I will say that this is a decent first outing for Morahan.

As far as action goes, I actually think the film’s best sword fight is not the climax, but when Connor and Kane fight inside the former Buddhist temple.  It’s a very dynamic fight with some great physical and dialogue exchanges.  With the duel being on Holy Ground, it ends in a very startling way as the blades of Connor and Kane’s swords shatter.  It shows one ominous way such betrayals of the rules are dealt with.  The final climactic duel is a well executed sequence with great cinematography and good effects.  It is very physically intense.  However, it has one stinging point I will get to momentarily.

The orchestral score by J. Peter Robinson is very good.  I particularly enjoyed the Japanese and Middle Eastern flourishes at the appropriate moments creating a unique musical atmosphere.  The score is very thrilling and vibrant with a plenty of character.  What I have a problem with is the clunky use of second rate hard rock songs in this film.  With the original movie, Queen naturally brought an epic and emotionally rich depth to the film with their songs alongside Michael Kamen’s gorgeous score.  Highlander 2 essentially focused only on Stewart Copeland’s grand, operatic score.  With this film, these rock songs are just bad and obnoxious, and don’t complement Robinson’s score at all.  The worst part comes in the climactic battle between Kane and MacLeod.  Someone recorded a blatant knock-off of Mötley Crüe’s “Dr. Feelgood,” and it terribly degrades the entire climax.  I’m sure Robinson could’ve composed something beautifully dramatic and triumphant instead of that schlock.  Where the filmmakers get it right with the licensed music is with Loreena McKennitt’s version of “Bonny Portmore.”  This is a gorgeous and deeply emotional song which would become a staple of the franchise from here on out.  I really adore its beauty.

On the up side, the visual effects are very good.  During the 90s, movie goers were treated to a lot of primitive CGI, but this movie really gives us some good quality effects.  The illusions of Nakano and Kane are given a great, magical look that flow very smoothly with the on-screen action.  There’s nary a bad effect anywhere in the film, save for the quickening flashing across the Moroccan desert sky.  Otherwise, this really is some beautiful work.

Although, I think the filmmakers kind of took a wide liberty with the term “illusion.”  An illusion shouldn’t allow Kane to transform into a bird and fly away.  Even the ability to create solid objects from either Kane or Nakano is arguable as an illusion.  They should’ve just came out and said it was straight up magic.  Although, I know even that gets into a muddled area in that, if it is full-on magic, why would it be that either man can do only so little with the power.  Nether of them is exactly Merlin casting spells and unleashing epic, fantastical wizardry.  So, it’s a real strange line to walk, and is probably best not to scrutinize it.  Still, this is a review, and that’s what I’m meant to do.

I think what this film lacks the most is depth.  Emotions don’t run very deep, and we don’t really get much under the skin of these characters.  Again, Connor doesn’t feel like the same textured and fascinating character we had from the first Highlander.  I hate to continually make comparisons back to the first movie, but this film begs so much comparison that it is impossible to avoid it.  Nakano is a decent character, but has really no depth of any kind to offer.  The late Mako was very beloved in certain fandoms, but I don’t find his performance here very inspiring.  Whether or not you compared him to Sean Connery’s Ramirez, he is quite forgettable.  The film does have its moments of touching beauty and decent depth, but it does entirely feel like the filmmakers playing it safe.  They are not trying to dig into the soul of their characters, and that’s really a major mistake.  Case in point would be the French Revolution flashbacks would have worked so much better if there was more substance to grasp onto.  We get only glimpses of Connor and Sarah being in love.  It’s very weakly presented, and since it bares no relevance or impact upon the main plot with Connor and Kane, the filmmakers don’t spend great amounts of time on it.  I’m certainly not saying this is a terrible script, just a mediocre one that could’ve had better potential in more talented and motivated hands.  It worked for a fun action adventure film, but against the brilliant standards set with the original movie, it’s undoubtedly mediocre.

I had intended to offer some comparison between the director’s cut and the European cut of the film, but any differences are very minor.  The director’s cut adds in some more effects shots to enhance Kane’s sorcery, most notably with his arrival in New York being via a portal instead of just walking out on the docks as if he traveled by ship.  At the end, the European version excises the reuse of effects shots from Connor winning The Prize in the first Highlander that were present in both the theatrical and director’s cuts.  Sadly, the only change in the soundtrack comes at the end credits where the director’s cut has another bad hard rock track while the European cut features “Bonny Portmore” once again.  Both cuts are available on Region 1 DVD.  The original 1998 DVD has the true director’s cut, but the 2005 and 2011 DVDs, which claim to also be the “Special Director’s Cut,” are actually the European version only with the opening title card changed from Highlander III: The Sorcerer to Highlander: The Final Dimension.  I would lean towards buying the newer DVD since the film is given the anamorphic widescreen treatment resulting in vastly superior picture quality.  The image is clearer and colors are much more vibrant.  So, I am glad to have purchased it, regardless of there being no dramatic differences in the content of the film.

Ultimately, Highlander III is that sequel in the franchise that doesn’t get much attention.  The others have very notable issues that are hotly contested amongst fans, but this one keeps a low profile despite also having its fair share of mild problems.  While it surely doesn’t re-ignite the magic that the original movie captured, it’s a fun, disposable film that has its merits, but ultimately, can be forgotten about without a problem.  As is the difficulty in making a sequel to the original, where it ended definitively, the filmmakers had to indulge in a cheap end-runaround to make a sequel where there are still immortals out there.  Again, if you’re looking just for a fun movie that’s not going to take itself too seriously, then you can enjoy this movie.  I do find it entertaining but lacking in substance.  In my opinion, it’s a step in a better direction than Highlander 2: The Quickening, but not as good as what was being done on the television series at the time.

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November Update

Now that all the horror and James Bond movies are behind me, I will be returning to a much more leisurely schedule for reviews.  Forever Horror Month was a very rigorous output of content that I will not be repeating with posting one review per day.  There will be another Forever Horror Month next October, but it will be a much smaller undertaking.  It was fun sharing all of these horror films with everyone, but I did fall behind schedule due to several factors resulting in a difficult final week.  Yet, I was determined to make good on my word in completing the month.  So, I am proud to have pushed forward all the way through to the end with a total of 41 reviews published in 31 days.

I do have a few reviews planned for the next month or so.  There has been a very analytical review of Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country in progress since mid-September, and I intend to have that completed by month’s end.  I might do another Star Trek movie review depending on time and sustained interest in writing it.  If it happens, it will be posted ahead of The Undiscovered Country review.  I also have the urge to watch and write reviews of some more Highlander movies.  I have just ordered an alternate cut of Highlander: The Final Dimension on DVD for an impending review.  I have the original 1998 U.S. DVD featuring the actual director’s cut, but the 2005 and 2011 DVD releases have the European cut of the film.  So, I want to include some comparison in the review since I believe there are good and bad differences in both from what I have read.

Beyond all of that, I do still want to have reviews of The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi up before the year is out.  If they do come within that time, they are certainly going to be happening in December.  And yes, I am very aware of the entire Disney purchase of Lucasfilm Limited, but until I know how Disney will handle the property of Star Wars, I have no opinion to pass upon it or the impending new trilogy of Episodes VII, VIII, & IX.  I’ll just wait and see.  It should be an interesting ride as they develop, regardless.

Lastly, you may have noticed some changes since November 1st.  This is because I decided to make Forever Cinematic an official product of RavensFilm Productions.  Since I put so much time and passion into this blog, I felt it was a logical choice to meld them together.  Nothing has changed beyond the slight cosmetics, but you can now see the Twitter feed for RavensFilm to the right under the Forever Cinematic Facebook feed.  I also expanded the social media sharing options for the blog posts.  I will be refining other minor aspects of Forever Cinematic over the coming weeks.

-Nick Michalak


Highlander II: The Quickening (1991)

By no means am I here to say this film is not worth the scorn it has received from day one.  Highlander II: The Quickening absolutely conceptually butchered most everything that made the original fantasy adventure film so amazing.  However, there are certain elements that people don’t give this film credit for in spite of its storyline and screenplay failings.  Of course, it’s one of the worst sequels ever made, and it has more wrong with it than any one reviewer should torture him or herself to detail.  So, I am exercising restraint to not scrutinize everything that is wrong with it.  While I will blatantly point out why this film was a failure, I do want to give credit to what I feel are highly admirable qualities for the film.  However, the bad outweighs any good you can find in this film, and while so many have covered why, it’s time to offer my perspective and insight into this notorious motion picture.

By the end of the 20th century, the Ozone layer has been damaged severely, and Connor MacLeod (Christopher Lambert) is the one who brings all the great minds together to create a protective energy shield around the Earth.  However, a quarter century later, humanity lives in a perpetual nighttime world as the sun’s rejuvenating, life-giving rays do not penetrate the shield, and the world is in a state of depression.  They’ve lost hope in this dreary world.  Because of this, Louise Marcus (Virginia Madsen) and her anti-shield team break into one of the Shield Corporation’s stations, and discover that the radiation above the shield is normal.  This means the Ozone layer has healed itself, and the shield is no longer needed.  Of course, it is a corporation, and they are just interested in capitalistic greed.  Louise is the only one of her team to escape alive.  Connor is now an old man, having become mortal after defeating the Kurgan to win ‘The Prize.’  While enjoying a night at the opera, he has flashbacks (similar to those during the wrestling match in the first film), but instead of the Scottish Highlands, he remembers his life as a rebel on the planet Ziest (or from a distant past on Earth, depending on which version you watch).  Here is where he met Ramirez (Sean Connery), and battled the evil General Katana (Michael Ironside).  For their rebellious acts, they are exiled to different points in time on the planet Earth where they will be immortal, and have to battle other immortals until only one remains.  The winner will have the choice to return home to live out the rest of their lives.  Despite the fact that MacLeod has been mortal for nearly forty years, and is a matter of months away from inevitable death by natural causes, Katana is not willing to wait any longer to see his enemy die.  He sends two comical spiky haired warriors to assassinate Connor, but it backfires making MacLeod immortal again, taking into two Quickenings.  One restores his youth, and the other allows him to resurrect Ramirez back in Scotland.  By this time, Louise has found Connor in an effort to use his influence to get the shield shut down.  Now, with his youth restored, they become sexually involved, and he becomes invested in her mission against the corporation.  Meanwhile, Katana decides to dispatch his enemies first hand.  He forges an alliance with the major tool that is Shield Corporation CEO David Blake (John C. McGinley) to combat MacLeod, Ramirez, & Louise.  With two over the top villains, one more ridiculous than the other, our heroes don’t exactly have their work cutout for them, but that’s the least of this film’s problems.

Okay, this is actually not the worst Highlander film ever made.  That dishonor belongs to Highlander: The Source.  If you’ve seen it, and I surely hope you have not, I don’t see how you could disagree with that assessment.  You thought it was impossible to sink below Highlander II, but you were proven wrong.  Regardless of that, here’s why this film is so reviled.  At its most basic, this first sequel takes what was pure wondrous fantasy, and turns it into cheap science fiction.  There was a simplicity to the mystery behind immortals in what screenwriter Gregory Widen created with Highlander.  “It’s a kind of magic,” offered up a sense of charm and wide eyed wonder to the idea.  For me, the origin of immortals is unimportant.  Through all the other films and the television series, where they came from was never as important as their journey to wherever they were going.  The story of Highlander is one of adventure, love, legend, pain, heart, wisdom, and magic on an epic scale that spans countless centuries.  Watching how our Clan MacLeod heroes battle through it all, and how it molds them into more seasoned, weathered, and wiser people is what it has all been about.  It was never about aliens from another planet, time travel, shield generators replacing the Ozone, or weirdo assassins flying through the air cackling like hyenas.  The premise of this sequel was fundamentally flawed from the beginning, and no matter which version you watch, it’s still a failure in that department.

The only thing Highlander II has going for it in its defense is that the production was full of problems, conflicts, money issues, and creative differences.  That can explain the clusterfuck of bad execution, but still, people signed on board due to the screenplay and premise that this film was built upon.  They have no defense for that.  Christopher Lambert supposedly would only do the film if they brought back Sean Connery, and that resulted in a very peculiar resurrection.  While Lambert and Connery have fine chemistry which provides the film with a good deal of fun, I have to admit that Ramirez was rather shoehorned into this.  The entire film would likely flow along far better without him at all, and make room for more relevant elements to be fleshed out.  Ramirez has some decent wisdom to impart that works itself into the story by the end, but it would be easy to write around, if needed.  Still, it is good entertainment seeing MacLeod & Ramirez interact on more of an equal footing like friends or brothers instead of the student-teacher relationship they had before.  Of course, I could’ve done without the out-of-place excessive humor resulting from Ramirez’s inclusion.

Now, Michael Ironside is indeed a fine actor that is able to stretch out into a wider range than he is typically typecast into.  The failing of many Highlander feature film villains is that the screenwriters try to make them carbon copies of the Kurgan.  They are given similar crazy scenes, over the top characterizations, and even all their names start with a ‘K’ – Katana, Kane, Kell.  The television series ultimately became the real treasure trove of fascinating and original villains including my favorite in Xavier St. Cloud.  Here, Katana is hard to take seriously most times.  He is over the top, almost badly comical in certain scenes, and all for the wrong reasons.  The original film handled its characters with weight and respect.  It made them dimensional, textured people, or at least with the Kurgan, formidable and frightening.  Katana constantly comes off as the bad guy whose already lost, and is just lashing out because of a bruised ego due to that loss.  He seems desperate, and incapable of truly being a singular threat.  He’s certainly not intelligent, as the film eventually and blatantly reveals, which I will get back to.  He doesn’t have the bravado to truly become the adversary he needs to be to confront and take down MacLeod.  I do not lay too much fault on Ironside.  This is what the screenwriters and filmmakers gave him, and he did what was demanded of him.  Still, I know he’s such a better actor, and definitely capable of being a better villain than this film allows him to be.  John C. McGinley is the same way.  I have seen him put in so many performances over the last twenty or so years that I know he can do better than this.  He has even regretted how he portrayed this role.  I am always glad when an actor can look back on their work, and make an objective assessment of what they did wrong.

Lambert is his usual charming self, but I feel all the world weariness and haunting sense of Connor MacLeod was lost.  On one hand, I can see him becoming a lighter weight character due to having slain the Kurgan, and come to peace with much of what he’s lost.  Still, we see that even more heartache has befallen him since then, and while he demonstrates mourning for it, it doesn’t carry with him throughout the film.  Even the accent Christopher used in the first film is abandoned, and frankly, would never reappear with Connor ever again.  Still, Connor MacLeod remains a character to invest yourself in.  He’s still handled in a decently well rounded fashion.  It’s the just the horrible “origin of immortals” scenes that really damage it all.  It sort of makes all we knew of who Connor was in the first film nearly inconsequential, not to mention, wholly confusing to a mind boggling degree.  That plot point alone creates more contradictions and catastrophic problems with the entire established mythos to the point of wondering, “Why the hell did they go forward with it at all?”  And again, why they went back to an “origin of immortals” story with Highlander: The Source when it failed so miserably the first time?  Of course, there are no good answers to those questions.

Anyway, Virginia Madsen is probably the only genuine, grounded talent in the whole film.  She always turns in a solid, pitch perfect performance, and she does so here.  She’s a fine love interest with a dash of action ability.  She and Lambert work well together, but not amazingly so.  It’s well handled and well played, but there is a missing romantic aspect that I think every Highlander love should have.  The entire base concept of Highlander has a very romanticized nature to it.  There is a sexual encounter here, but there’s not much intimacy between the characters to really forge a deep emotional connection.  There’s just too much plot getting in the way for that, and of course, they needed to shove Sean Connery into the mix to detract from that relationship.  You see, for every potentially good idea, there’s something else thrown into the film to detract from it.  The potential of the elements that could be used to improve the film are limited to make room for something that brings down the film.

For instance, Russell Mulcahy, in these earlier years, always made gorgeous films with such enveloping cinematography.  However, where the first film was able to mostly thrive in practical locations and expansive sets, in this film, the first major action sequence that is supposed to be a large area of the city is confined to a soundstage, and it looks like a soundstage.  The scope and scale of it is so small, you can’t help but see the limitations of the production, and it detracts from the visual aspect of the feature.  Sequences may be shot with great angles, unique lenses, and inspired camera moves, but you can almost always tell when they shot it on a cramped back lot or soundstage.  A real city street has depth and scope with block after block of buildings, skyscrapers, and movement crisscrossing in the distance.  It has character from its history and people over the decades and centuries.  None of that can be seen here, and it only begins to sell how inferior this sequel is to its predecessor.  And even for all the improved practical effects, and more visually impressive Quickenings, the bulk of the visual effects (pre-Special Edition) are not up to standards for a film that came out the same year as Terminator 2: Judgment Day.  Regardless, when you get outside of that, and onto the truly beautiful and well designed interior scene sets, the production design and cinematography SHINES.  Mulcahy’s music video-born artistry finally comes to glorious life, and you see that classic grand Highlander style manifest itself.  The lighting is very theatrical, moody, and atmospheric at times.  However, it seems a little heavy on the Blade Runner influence in both lighting and production design.  Still, big dolly and crane shots really bring forth that epic, large scale cinematic feel which is why I am attracted to Mulcahy’s 1980s & early 1990s films on through to The Shadow.

The score by Stewart Copeland does have a lot of depth and richness.  It is highly orchestral bringing a unique identity to this film as it is quite different from Michael Kamen’s score for the original Highlander.  Like with Connor’s character, gone are the haunting or mysterious qualities in the music.  And while there is essentially no Queen in the soundtrack, we do get a fine closing credits song from Lou Gramm of Foreigner titled “One Dream.”  Gramm formed a band called Shadow King at this time, but it was very short lived.  The song is hard to find commercially as no soundtrack was released in the US, but I have come to enjoy “One Dream” as much as any other Highlander musical staple.  Now, I’ve always been put off that the final battle between MacLeod & Katana has next to no music behind it at all.  Not to mention, it’s a rather brief duel.  Anti-climactic indeed.  It’s almost as if it’s there because it needs to be, and they just want to wrap up the film as quickly as possible.  There’s no epic quality to it, no passionate intensity.  It’s a bunch of dull clanging back and forth for a few moments.  Still, the score has gained some good respect from the franchise’s fans, and Stewart Copeland is an exceptionally talented and diverse musician from his work as the drummer for The Police on through to many other film and television scores.  He surely gave this feature a wide, full sound that may have been more than it deserved.  It’s not always entirely to my liking, but I can respect the musical quality and artistry of it.

What I can’t respect is the creative process behind the idea of this movie.  Okay.  They wanted to do a sequel.  That’s understandable, but that’s also the problem.  The first film ends definitively.  Connor wins ‘The Prize,’ and thus, there are no more immortals left in the world.  There’s really no credible way around that ending, and making a prequel about Connor is foolish because there’s no mystery of who would survive.  Gregory Widen wrote a fantastic, self-contained screenplay with no allusions for a sequel.  Even still, how these filmmakers conjure up the idea of all immortals being aliens from another planet shatters all logic because everything they develop in the sequel contradicts everything from the original film.  In later revised cuts of Highlander II, the immortals are changed to being from Earth’s distant, forgotten past.  So, now they are time travelers which makes even less sense, but as I concluded sometime ago, there is absolutely no way you can re-cut this film to have either premise make any real sense.  Every fiber of this plot is fundamentally flawed from every angle.  The plot holes are atrocious, and are blatantly stated by the characters in the movie itself!  How do you write a screenplay with such plot holes, do nothing to mend them, but have enough awareness about them to have the characters spell them out in detailed discussion?  It sounds like a screenwriting paradox that could unravel the very fabric of the universe, or drive one totally insane trying to make sense of it.  MacLeod states to Katana that he was ready to settle down and die peacefully, but then, Katana sends his cackling henchmen to change all that.  Now, he’s immortal again, just where he didn’t want to be.  Katana would’ve had his victory of MacLeod dying if he just sat on his ass and did nothing!  Even his idiot henchman caught onto this, and Katana just slaps him in the face for having a rational thought.

The theatrical cut even made Russell Mulcahy walk out of the cinema within fifteen minutes.  The editing in it was an abomination of continuity.  They tried splicing together two different duels for one massive end battle, but it features Connor using two different swords in two different outfits.  Subsequent re-edits such as the Renegade Version or Special Edition had more linear coherence, but hardly resolve any of the base issues with the movie.  Frankly, as I said, that is impossible.

Flushing away the adventurous fantasy for idiotically conceived science fiction explanations leaves a horrible, bitter taste in any fan’s mouth.  Beyond just the irresolvable continuity contradictions, this is a contradiction of all that Highlander was based upon, and later re-established itself as through the television series.  Highlander II: The Quickening became so reviled that it was disassociated from all continuity.  That’s not a regular occurrence for a franchise when millions of dollars are poured into a feature film, but it seems like it was an experience many would have rather forgotten in part, if not in whole.

While there are admirable technical qualities in the film, there is surely nothing within it that can hope to redeem this epic failure.  It’s become legendary and notorious to the point where it’s awfulness has transcended through pop culture as a benchmark for a bad film.  Christopher Lambert remains a solid lead for the franchise with an enjoyable performance, but as with so many aspects of the movie, it’s more indulgent in itself than really bringing something memorable to the table.  Connery’s presence alone is self-indulgent, and Katana is a generally weak, one-dimensional villain played up more for laughs than as a cunning, intimidating adversary.  The producers can continue to update the visual effects and refine the editing, but it’s only making a pile of garbage easier to look at.  This is not a film where I say watch it for yourself to make your own determination apart from its reputation.  Even on its own merits, it’s not a good movie.  In itself, it has unforgivable failings, obvious limitations, and baffling errors in logic, to say the extreme least.  It certainly wasn’t the only controversial misstep in Highlander, but it was the first.  And for that, it will remain a stigma on the franchise for all time.